St. Catharines firefighters equipped with life-saving opioid medication

St. Catharines firefighters began training on how to give individuals suffering from opioid overdoes Naloxone, an emergency medication to help save their lives. St. Catharines fire trucks will now carry Naloxone, an emergency medication that can reverse the effects of an overdose from fentanyl, heroin, methadone and other opioids. City of St. Catharines photo

St. Catharines firefighters are being trained to give individuals suffering from opioid overdoes emergency medication to help save their lives.

With funding from the province, St. Catharines fire trucks will now carry Naloxone, an emergency medication that can reverse the effects of an overdose from fentanyl, heroin, methadone and other opioids. St. Catharines firefighters began training this week on how to administer Naloxone by nasal spray.

“Opioids are very dangerous and we know they are in Niagara,” said Mayor Walter Sendzik. “We know there are people who are caught in the grips of addiction in our community. Equipping our firefighters with Naloxone will help save lives while we continue to work with our partners to respond to the opioid crisis.”

The Province of Ontario is providing free Naloxone kits throughout the province. Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long Term Care and Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services expanded the program late last year to include fire and police services. The province will make Naloxone kits available to St. Catharines Fire Services, two for every fire truck as well as replacements, through Niagara Region Public Health.

Residents who suspect someone is suffering from a drug overdose should call 9-1-1.

Acting Fire Chief Jeff McCormick said St. Catharines already responds to medical calls, including drug overdoses, and equipping fire trucks with Naloxone will help save lives when firefighters arrive first to the scene of an overdose call.

“St. Catharines firefighters have always been able to provide assistance for medical calls,” said the acting fire chief. “Having Naloxone on board gives our fire crews an additional piece of equipment that might help save a life.”

Source – City of St. Catharines press release

 


 

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